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Re: My last day of regular work is tomorrow

Posted: Mon Jan 06, 2020 2:19 pm
by Bkeepr
iasteve,

I don't see any picture! One post does have the word "image" but nothing shows up. It might be my settings, but am not sure...just wanted you to know I couldn't see any pics, or I'd probably recognize a GSP. :D

Re: My last day of regular work is tomorrow

Posted: Mon Jan 06, 2020 3:23 pm
by iasteve
Image
Image
Image

Do these images show up?
Last one is mother and pup. Looks like they're mad at each other.

If pics don't show up maybe the other site (upland journal) doesn't allow linking.
They do show up for me.

Son in law left and son right in first pic.

Re: My last day of regular work is tomorrow

Posted: Mon Jan 06, 2020 4:30 pm
by Bkeepr
Yes, great pictures! Good looking dogs and kids, and they're all great hunters from the looks of the harvest. Wow. Around here, upland bird hunters are few and far between, so I'm glad to see a family who is serious about it. Almost everybody here I know who hunts has one foot in the grave--no youngsters seem to be interested anymore.

Re: My last day of regular work is tomorrow

Posted: Fri Jan 10, 2020 5:19 pm
by GeneMO
slow seeing this. good for you !!!

Gene

Re: My last day of regular work is tomorrow

Posted: Sat Jan 11, 2020 4:34 pm
by Krazngc
Good looking dogs!!! Enjoy, now that you have the time!

Krazngc

Doris

Re: My last day of regular work is tomorrow

Posted: Sat Jan 11, 2020 10:35 pm
by Patbridges81
I turned 30 in October and I felt old. Now I'm feeling pretty young knowing I'll probably work till I die cause retirement will probably be a thing of the past in 30 more years. Maybe being on this page will help me feel young lol, I know I first joined the Kountry Living page before I was old enough to drive.

Re: My last day of regular work is tomorrow

Posted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 7:29 am
by Bkeepr
Patbridges81 wrote:
Sat Jan 11, 2020 10:35 pm
I turned 30 in October and I felt old. Now I'm feeling pretty young knowing I'll probably work till I die cause retirement will probably be a thing of the past in 30 more years...
Pat,

if I could give you some advice without offending you.

When I was 22, my new wife and I (on advice of an older friend) met with a financial adviser with a goal of retiring comfortably some day. The advisor asked about our goals, and he laughed at me when I told him I didn't think social security would be around by the time I retired so I wanted to try to save enough to retire without needing SS. Well, he gave us great advice, which we followed, and I'll try to summarize here:

Start saving something *every* month, and invest the savings in a good mutual fund. Don't try to "time" the market, just pick an amount and promise yourself to invest that amount on the same day every month. You can afford something, even if you have to give up something you want to do so, but decide in advance, and invest.

Set your mutual fund to re-invest the dividends to buy more with them without you needing to watch the market or do anything.

As you get promotions or pay raises throughout life, use a significant amount of each pay raise to increase how much you are investing. that's the easiest time to increase your savings amount, before you're used to the extra money.

Buying a house is another form of investment. Buy one as soon as you can, but continue to save and invest in mutual funds too.

That basic method worked for us, and for all of my friends who did it. 40 years later, we have accumulated enough that it appears we can live comfortably--no, we're not rich, but we can be comfortable--til we're a tad over 100. Hopefully that's enough, because I probably won't want to start working again at 103!!! :lol:

Re: My last day of regular work is tomorrow

Posted: Sun Jan 12, 2020 11:08 am
by Red Dave
Bkeepr wrote:
Sun Jan 12, 2020 7:29 am

Pat,

if I could give you some advice without offending you.

When I was 22, my new wife and I (on advice of an older friend) met with a financial adviser with a goal of retiring comfortably some day. The advisor asked about our goals, and he laughed at me when I told him I didn't think social security would be around by the time I retired so I wanted to try to save enough to retire without needing SS. Well, he gave us great advice, which we followed, and I'll try to summarize here:

Start saving something *every* month, and invest the savings in a good mutual fund. Don't try to "time" the market, just pick an amount and promise yourself to invest that amount on the same day every month. You can afford something, even if you have to give up something you want to do so, but decide in advance, and invest.

Set your mutual fund to re-invest the dividends to buy more with them without you needing to watch the market or do anything.

As you get promotions or pay raises throughout life, use a significant amount of each pay raise to increase how much you are investing. that's the easiest time to increase your savings amount, before you're used to the extra money.

Buying a house is another form of investment. Buy one as soon as you can, but continue to save and invest in mutual funds too.

That basic method worked for us, and for all of my friends who did it. 40 years later, we have accumulated enough that it appears we can live comfortably--no, we're not rich, but we can be comfortable--til we're a tad over 100. Hopefully that's enough, because I probably won't want to start working again at 103!!! :lol:
I can't express my endorsement of Bkeeper's advice strongly enough. Read it, then read it again and again. Print it out and post it on your refrigerator. It is that spot on.

We were a bit older when we first consulted a financial advisor, but when we did it was a watershed event. It allowed us to retire at age 60 with NO financial worries.

A word about financial advisors: Find one that is a FEE-ONLY FIDUCIARY. That is very important. Stay away from people who want to sell you financial products. These can include mutual fund salesmen, brokers, banks, insurance companies, and most of all avoid anybody who wants you to buy an annuity. A Fee-Only Fiduciary will charge you for their advice, just like a lawyer or an accountant, but they have to, by law, put your interests ahead of their own. Anybody who wants to sell you financial products might try to sell you something that is good for them, not you.

I wish we had known about advisors and what Bkeeper said when I was in my 20's. We were late to the party, but I'm glad we got there eventually.