Avoiding flash rust on newly-cleaned machined steel parts

Stories, News and General Yakking
Okierob
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2019 3:46 am

Re: Avoiding flash rust on newly-cleaned machined steel parts

Post by Okierob » Sat Aug 22, 2020 9:55 am

For small parts , a vacuum chamber can be as easy as a mason jar and a vacuum sealer adapter for the large mouth lids. Or the adapter and a hand pump brake bleeder.

Bkeepr
Posts: 253
Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2019 7:23 am
Location: West-central Maryland

Re: Avoiding flash rust on newly-cleaned machined steel parts

Post by Bkeepr » Sun Aug 23, 2020 7:51 am

Okierob,

thanks, another interesting idea for me to try out. Many of the clocks I have that I'd be working on have fairly small movements, so a large mason jar might work. Have you ever used a brake bleeder that way? Is it possible to get a good vacuum quickly, or does it take a lot of time and pumping?

thanks again.

Okierob
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2019 3:46 am

Re: Avoiding flash rust on newly-cleaned machined steel parts

Post by Okierob » Sun Aug 23, 2020 10:23 pm

Never tried the brake bleeder.

GeneMO
Posts: 155
Joined: Wed Aug 21, 2019 7:52 pm
Location: Speed Missouri

Re: Avoiding flash rust on newly-cleaned machined steel parts

Post by GeneMO » Mon Aug 24, 2020 7:15 pm

Vacuum sealers for freezing meat and leftovers. Most of them have a port to hook a suction hose too. The higher end ones come with several different sizes of clear, plastic containers that have the port on top, complete with hose and all. They will develop a vacuum, but not sure how to "hold' the vacuum. Never used that part of the machines. They must have a one way valve on the top of the container.

Vacuum sealers new are generally less than a hundred bucks I think. I see them on for sale sites or at rummage sales for $10-$20.

Gene

Post Reply