Question: electric fences and reducing the shock??

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Bkeepr
Posts: 290
Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2019 7:23 am
Location: West-central Maryland

Question: electric fences and reducing the shock??

Post by Bkeepr » Thu Oct 15, 2020 8:19 am

Guys, I was wondering if there's any "good old boy" ways to reduce the shock/power on an electric fencer? I know I can figure something out if I drag out my engineering textbooks, but I'm really looking for something quick and easy.

Here's my problem: my pups (not small, but still pups) get out of the backyard fence and go exploring, winding up miles away within minutes. So I used one of my livestock electric fencers, and it works well. It is designed/powered for miles of fence, but is hooked up to just a few hundred feet in the back yard. The meter is showing ~13k volts on the very short run of wire around the backyard, and it makes my teeth feel like they're blowing out when I hit the fence by accident. Each of my pups has hit it at least once and almost always stay away...unless they get excited and forget. So I think cutting the voltage by 2/3s or 1/2 would still keep them in without making touching it quite such an emotional event for all of us.

Looking for quick, easy, controllable solutions!

thanks!!

Red Dave
Posts: 94
Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2019 8:12 am

Re: Question: electric fences and reducing the shock??

Post by Red Dave » Thu Oct 15, 2020 11:07 am

It kind of depends on the internal working of the fence charger. Without a schematic, all we can do is speculate. If it is 110/120 AC powered, you may be able to get into the primary circuit of the transformer and add resistance, which theoretically should lower secondary voltage.

If you can get a few high voltage resistors, maybe you could put them in the output circuit which wouldn't change the open circuit output voltage, but might reduce the current available at the output. The current is what really provides the punch that "makes your teeth feel like they are blowing out", the voltage would still bite, but it would be more like the static discharge when touching a doorknob in the winter.

If there are capacitors paralleled across the output, perhaps removing them might reduce some of the instantaneous current available when you touch it.

But Be careful, I'm just spitballing here. If it's a newer electronic type, there might not be much of anything you can do to reduce the output power without ruining it. In fact you might make it worse. I'd hate for you to injure one of your pups.

Check with the fence charger manufacturer. Maybe they have something already available to do what you want?

Jim in RP
Posts: 153
Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2019 6:16 pm
Location: Negros Island

electric fencer,

Post by Jim in RP » Fri Oct 16, 2020 12:38 am

No I am not cruel. Electricity can be a very good training tool. Now don’t laugh at me. :lol: But as a 9 year old, my older brother (13), talked me into pissing on grandpa's electric fence, that taught me a life long lesson. :cry: I have a Rottweiler that marked his territory by pissing on my gates. Just in case you didn't know, piss is a very conductor of electricity and is very corrosive. A few years later I had holes developing in the bottom of my gate. Remembering lesson I learned at 9. I hot wired the bottom of my gates with 230 VAC. I have 12 stents in my chest and made a connection from left ring finger through my chest to my right palm. Ring finger was numb for several minutes after but no other side effects. Volts go up, amps go down and volts go down amps go up. It is amps that can put you in a hurt. Rottweiler no longer pisses on the gates. The stray dog do not piss there either. Some dog trainers use electric collars in their training. Just like me, electricity will leave a lasting mark on the memory when applied to the right appendage. :o
Only The Dead Have Seen The end of WAR. "Plato"

Bkeepr
Posts: 290
Joined: Fri Jul 12, 2019 7:23 am
Location: West-central Maryland

Re: Question: electric fences and reducing the shock??

Post by Bkeepr » Mon Oct 19, 2020 9:13 am

Thanks, guys.

RD, I am pretty sure your idea of swapping out a capacitor would work, but am really looking for an external solution. My son and daughter-in-law (both EE's) are now on it, and think they may have a relatively cheap/easy solution. Being geeks (and they're tired of my joking that electrical engineers are not *real* engineers), they want to play with the idea before telling me... :?

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